IN SERVICE OF HISTORY

“A house is more than just the addition of the stones that structures it ; it is also  the mysterious spirit that inhabits it.

 It is the density of time that constitutes a place”

François-Xavier Bellamy

 

La Marcotte, la Poterne, Le Moulin…all of our houses have souls and are filled with history. Sometimes having been abandoned for years, a certain amount of  enthusiasm has been needed to rebuild these masterpieces of French patrimony. Here, Pierres d’Histoire recounts the origins of each house, the marking events that took place there, the people that have lived there, and the  restoration campaigns. In short, all the elements that make each of these structures unique in their being. 

 

 

Le Moulin de Pezenas

 

In an authentic hamlet set in the South of France, between Montpellier and Béziers, under the shade of plane trees which date from several hundred years back, sits Le Moulin de Pézenas. It is one of the last historical mills of the Hérault region. It originates from the 12th century and it remained in use as late as 1918. It was completely renovated between 2014 and 2016, becoming an ideal retreat in the exceptionally well preserved countryside there.

Le Hameau de Courances

Although the outbuildings of Château de Courances were, until World War II, the cradle of a dynamic economic activity between the Château and the village, it is important to remember that this activity was unfortunately interrupted for nearly half a century.

Le Domaine de Ravenoville

 

Originally the Ravenoville Estate was a rural estate, enriched in the 18thcentury by the building of an eponym castle, ordered by a certain Monsieur Louis Berryer, superintendent of finances and close to Colbert.

La Poterne du Château de Fleury-en-Bière

The story starts in 1550, the year when Côme Clausse, already owner of Courances, buys the de Fleury grounds and builds “a communal area symmetrically surrounding a big front courtyard, part of the castle, its medieval tower and dwelling, plus the main wing on the right side”.  The works were conducted by head builder Gilles le Breton, executing the plans of Pierre Lescot, the architect of Louvre at that time.

La Marcotte

 

The story begins in 1924, when a boy of Russian nobility travelled to France, following the exile of his family who fled the Revolution. Arriving in the village of Fleury-en-Bière, he meets a young French woman whom he will marry years later.